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Roy

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  1. 10 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    We have "styles" so why not use the same kind of code for setting up Page Setup "styles" we can select for a worksheet or file, then modify as and if needed on a worksheet? Or select several tabs, then apply the Page Setup "style" all at once. With maybe an "Apply To Chosen Worksheets" button in case the setup isn't in our previously defined styles? (You know, so you don't have to do the whole silly "Open Page Setup, Make a change, Save (applying it across select sheets), then change it back and Save again" routine that we have to apply to so many things?)

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  2. 50 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    @Franz: Sorry, one last clarification. If your colleague then changed the code, perhaps to "TTT", he would type precisely that, T-T-T, and Excel would store it internally (using my example below) as "uuu" and when he sent it back to you, you would never see either of those: it would show as "ddd" to you. Each of you is using abbreviations that make sense to you (or presumably you'd've chosen a different language version of Excel). So each of you USE and SEE logical language-appropriate codes while Excel really stores it however makes best sense to Microsoft. Everybody wins.

    Roy commented  · 

    @Franz: Then we ARE talking about the same thing. I am not predicating anything on the Windows language version or settings. Solely the language used in the user's copy of Excel. So YOU use an English language version and use a date code of literally "dddd" which makes perfect sense to you because "d" = "day" fits your English language expectations. It works perfectly. You send it to a colleague who uses a German language version of Excel because, presumably, he prefers German. What HE sees when he looks at your date code is "TTTT" (i.e.: he does NOT see the "dddd" you typed in). That makes immediate sense to him and eases his understanding of the code and happiness with the spreadsheet. What neither of you know, or care about, is that when you typed that "dddd" in your spreadsheet, Excel really saved it as, say, "uuuu". But that is completely INTERNAL to Excel: neither of you will ever see "uuuu". YOU see it rendered for English Excell as "dddd" and your colleague sees it rendered for German Excel as "TTTT". Notice that this is utterly independent of your Windows language version/settings: even though your Windows is in Italian and uses Italian date settings, you will NEVER see "gggg" because this only involves Excel and ITS settings, not the Windows language and settings. All done here though.

    Roy commented  · 

    @Franz: Yes, the operating system does impact how things come up, etc. But I thought you were looking for the actual formulas used by people to show things in the formula using language appropriate symbols. I use English Excel and would not find using "T" in any way intuitive the way I do find using "d" for "day." But more so, if I share (or create for) a worksheet with a, say, German individual or company, I will desperately want to use "d" but will equally desperately want the German user to see "T" when using or evaluating the spreadsheet. If Excel used some underlying code that we never see, it could present "d" to me (opening it with English Excel) yet, without missing a beat or making any change at all, present "T" to the German user using his German Excel. But it looks like I missed your point in the suggestion. Still, I'd like to see it so work can be directly shared much more easily. And a worker in, say, Malaysia, could create a useful spreadsheet for me without ever learning more English than needed for negotiating the contract to produce it.

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    Roy commented  · 

    It seems like a simple abstraction. Excel would use a set of codes only it has access to for the actual saved version of any such format. Excel would (does?) check for language default when starting (could offer options here) and show codes in the formulas displayed according to the language appropriate abbreviations. For instance, the "gggg" displayed to the Italian default language user, and used by that user, but the actual saved formula would be whatever (say "!!!!" for all it matters. A German user might see "TTTT" while I might see "dddd". In fact, ALL language related matters in formulas could be done this way. Or if they already are, then this could be slipped into that functionality.

  3. 5 votes
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  4. 5 votes
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  5. 66 votes
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  6. 4 votes
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  7. 5 votes
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  8. 7 votes
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  9. 8 votes
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  10. 11 votes
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  11. 153 votes
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    Thanks for the suggestion. I think I’ve seen some related requests, I’ll look at merging them to make sure the votes properly reflect the ask. We’ll prioritize this into the execution pipe appropriately based on the number of votes.

    Cheers,
    John [MS XL]

    Roy commented  · 

    Lordy, if we can resize a window, the formula bar can certainly upsize by a line every time we run off the end or type Alt-Enter... He's got it exactly, it's incredibly reasonable, no need for colors or "More" or anything short of exactly this.

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  12. 2 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Same here. Blank menus, mouse doesn't seem to move to newly selected cells, etc. But it is all still there so I can Alt-F-S (save), then exit Excel and start over. When it happens, it happens to ALL instances of Excel. Once in a while, clicking in a different instance (I often have two open) and going back will restore functionality, but only once in a while, not always, and at that point I feel a need to close it all down and restart it anyway for safety of the data. Interestingly, if I do select a different cell with the mouse or arrow keys, although no change happens on the display, when I Alt-F-S, Alt-F-X, and restart, then bring up the file, the cell or worksheet I selected is selected even though the movement never showed up before saving. I know this is more of a bug than a new feature being suggested, but it is often hard to look up a bug (how does one describe it to search for it?) and to report them (if you can't search for them, how will your description help?) and someone might be thrilled to find a little more about this one. Wonder what else so basic is newly wrong and lying in wait...

  13. 3 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    One can't really expect a program (by definition a child of the operating system) to track movement of files and other operating system level actions. HOWEVER, the file system gives or can give each file a unique identifier by which it is known to the system and a program can take the user's inputted file name and actually save the operating system's identifier for it always displaying the correct "human language" identifer in formulas and such. So if a file is moved and the file gets opened, there's no disconnect: Excel ALWAYS looked for it by the operating system identifier, not the human language identifier and so always finds it. The bigger issue is applying such abstraction on a wide basis. Most obvious example is useful prgramming languages vs. machine language programming. It always gets compiled to machine language, but humans work with understandable commands.

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