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Roy

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  1. 6 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Something like "last" could be the final parameter, or a final parameter could take negative numbers meaning begin counting instances from the end.

    Or the functions could be wrapped with {} (typed, not Ctrl-Alt-Esc produced so functionality wouldn't change just by being IN an overal array formula) and produce an array that CHOOSE() could work on, modifying it to allow "last" as a choice.

  2. 4 votes
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  3. 2 votes
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  4. 4 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    We have that already: just unselect the checkbox.

    (With it checked, you have to pick from the four options. If you uncheck the box, then the cursor won't move at all, but rather stay put, as you desire.)

    But it does give rise to the thought that being able to specify, for the spreadsheet not the user, things found in the options would be pretty nice. So with this one in particular, a given user might have Excel set up on his computer to move right after pressing ENTER, but the setting in the spreadsheet overrides that and the cursor stays put.

    So when needed, the behavior is changed, but has no effect on his usual settings. Any other file he works in would work as he usually desires and move right.

    Perhaps you have a Mac and create spreadsheets using the 1904 date system. You'd specify that for the spreadsheet and when I open it on my 1900 date system Excel setup, it would function perfectly without me having to change my program setting for it, then remember to change it back. And hardly lesser, I could have several files open at the same time, yours and a few that need the 1900 date system, and everything would work fine even though today I'd have no way to resolve that problem.

    Lots of other settings could be useful that way too. Think of all the tips and problems one sees on the internet that resolve to simple settings mismatches like that.

    But this exact thing is actually available as we "speak" by just deselecting the checkbox altogether.

  5. 3 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    @Jimmy:

    No.

    Copy an Excel cell, go to some other application, like a web browser showing someone's login screen, and you can directly paste the cell's text into the login prompts. Excel DOES tyr to include a LF/CR but those are usually ignored by the other application along with all the formatting Excel was applying: Only the text is pasted and without the LF/CR.

    Copy the same cell into any Office application I use and you get as much of the text plus formatting as the other application can stomach which varies by application and just what you're doing in the application. The dead minimum is text + LF/CR (the last being super annoying).

    This is perfectly fine, inside Office, as for quite a time a great selling point of the package was how well things in it worked together unlike pieces brought together. Then, as everything embraced that world, the marketing was how it still worked better inside Office. Which was great, no doubt, and still is, or usually is.

    But they are supposed to be smart enough to realize there are often times when the full transfer when pasting is not appropriate, is harmful, is useless, is... well, just not what should be done. They seem to realize this: that's why different parts of Office, different functions in them, take differing amounts of what's offered for the Paste.

    So why not here? If I want to paste a cell's contents into another cell, there's no mystery about what I want: I want the text, certainly not its formatting (or I would have just pasted the cell, not pasted INSIDE the cell, right?), and for d@*! sure, no stupid LF/CR. No mystery at all.

    So all Alexie Plourde and I are saying is, just like is done in many places throughout Office, give us that. It's such a little thing, doesn't even run afoul of how Excel and Office cheat the Clipboard concept, and is done in a hundred other places throughout Office. But while it's such a little thing, it would be hugely helpful when we need to copy in a whole cell's text. So, let them be helpful, eh?

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    Roy commented  · 

    Yep. Somewhat annoying. After all, the obvious default paste for Excel would be exactly what going back, kitting F2, copying, and then pasting would do.

    So there'd be nothing esoteric here, no "gosh, but there's so many possibilities of what to do that Excel could never decide" stuff.

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  6. 42 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    And this is apparently a feature available in the Mac version, so it's not like it is not doable.

    Oops... bad Roy... maybe that is a feature of the Mac and therefore available without much effort to the Mac version programmers. "Bad Roy"? Well, forgetting that such a nice feature is NOT, apparently, part of Windows...

    And therefore, this might not be so easy for the Windows version prgrammers, and they "why" of it could be a wee bit embarrassing to MS in general.

    But it would still be very handy.

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  7. 4 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Let me set a basis here, that folks might not be thinking of right off:

    I understand that when I filter something, the rest is still there. I really do.

    But:

    1) It is EASY to forget that you are working filtered data. Especially in an office with calls, emails, breaks and lunches, bosses, and so on. Then you've hammered your data with one thought-reduced Paste and File|Save.

    though more importantly,

    2) Folks USING your work usually don't have the least little idea. And telling them is like an elementary teacher telling a student something (studies show they retain about 25% of the disparate facts they are told during those years). THEY destroy on a frequent and constant schedule. Being bosses, often, makes it MY fault, not theirs, you understand...

    So if Excel wants Tables to take off with those filters for every column, more or less like it or not, or for filtering to work in practice, they need to consider excising this difficulty.

    And I suggest potential voters consider the above when deciding whether this is a real thing, or just one guy's whine. It makes NO judgment on YOUR understanding, rather it makes a difference to your work when it is in the real world. There's a reason YOU wrote the spreadsheet and THEY use it, and that reason leads directly into this problem.

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  8. 8 votes
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  9. 5 votes
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  10. 68 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Yes. If Excel can realize there are links, it can report WHATEVER it is basing the assertion upon.

    Then offer options, like a permanent breakage of the links, or a temporary one. And an option to edit directly the offending bit of material: with the object of editing away something it is misinterpreting as well as the object of being able to edit real links. The list should be presented in the "side panel" motif, each one selectable as one wishes and not dropped until Excel is told to remove it from the list.

    If Excel can see something as a link (whether it be real or corruption) and act in any way on that thought, it can add this to the list of acts it can perform.

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  11. 55 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    AND make it evaluate each portion of a formula: no evaluating a VLOOKUP() as a monolith, for instance.

    Or at least add a checkbox to enable the more granular approach.

    And to preempt the F9 comments, that helps, but has its own problems, not least of which is that for many bits in a formula, once you evaluate the piece with F9, it is unusable. So one must ESC, then begin again and not evaluate that bit or to Undo, and select a larger grain to proceed with... not always easy in practice if earlier evaluations have presented huge arrays. The Evaluate feature should be able to present that in a toaster-like usability. And the F9 approach is defeated when an array that would be presented is big.

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  12. 1,096 votes
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    Hi everyone,
    Stock data types are now available to all Windows Office 365 subscribers with an English editing language installed (our data is only available in English at this time). You can find some instructions on how to use the feature here: https://support.office.com/en-us/article/get-a-stock-quote-e5af3212-e024-4d4c-bea0-623cf07fbc54. The feature will also be appearing in Excel for Mac and Excel Online in early 2019 – as usual, Office Insiders will see the feature before the general population. See http://aka.ms/officeinsider for more info.

    One pro tip to locate instruments on a different exchange is to include an ISO country code alongside the symbol, for instance MX MSFT will tell Excel to grab Microsoft from the Mexican stock exchange instead of Nasdaq. We’ll be publishing more thorough documentation in the near future.

    We also acknowledge that this is only half of the requested feature in this suggestion – the current stock prices piece. The ability to…

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    Roy commented  · 

    "First iteration" is hopefully right. One cannot specify the data source, according to insider accounts, but must rely upon whatever good ol' Bing wants to present.

    Clearly unacceptable for even average stock needs.

    (But gosh, Bing will sure look like humans now want to use it for searches, won't it?)

    Second iteration? Let US decide the data source the Data Type functionality looks to.

  13. 3 votes
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  14. 2 votes
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  15. 6 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    I'm totally in sympathy with any effort to give perfect x-digit numbers. 15, say, like now, but with internal precision of at least 34 digits to handle just about any variation so the 15, say, digits are perfect.

    But... this isn't that. The "numbers" you refer to are not really numbers to ANYONE using them. They are strings of numerical text. So sadly, instead of voting for this, I just want to suggest you format them as text and never have a problem.

    Exactly this happens with our 16 digit credit card numbers. But they are not "numbers." We are never going to do math on them anymore than you will with a bank account number.

  16. 3 votes
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  17. 3 votes
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  18. 658 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Wyn Hopkins in https://excel.uservoice.com/forums/304921-excel-for-windows-desktop-application/suggestions/34353574-short-cut-key-for-paste-just-value (same idea) pointed out that many keyboards have a "Right-Click" key to the right of the spacebar.

    If so, you can press "Right-Click", then V to paste values in a simple keyboard shortcut.

    It takes a LOT of effort to overcome habits of the past enough to give it a real try (Alt-E-S-V is very ingrained in me), but once you do... it's a magical, zen-like experience...

    "Right-Click", V. Or together like Ctrl-V if old habits are just too hard to break.

    Thank you Mr. Hopkins!

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    Roy commented  · 

    I must say, after a few weeks of remembering to try Mr. Hopkins' Right-Click key, V... it's magical.

    A wonderful world!

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    Roy commented  · 

    I like Mr. Hopkins' Ctrl-V-V. Not only would it be easy (even easier than Alt-E, S, V, Enter) but I picture it as holding Ctrl down for both V's, not just the first (seems obvious, I know, but...) and enabling the program to watch for TWO letters while Ctrl is continuously held down opens a whole new world of shortcuts. And while few people give a tinker's da(r)n about anyone else's favorite idea for a "desperately needed" shortcut, but the truth is we need more shortcuts.

    And unless someone's going out on the limb of total, and I mean FROM THE GROUND UP TOTAL, restructuring for programs' shortcuts, we need a new batch to use. Ctrl or Alt held down continously while two (ooo... or... more?) keys are pressed offers a way forward in which logical batches can be assigned rather than picking the needed 2 or 4 from the few combos left. (Logical as in the Shift-"Key" for inserting something, and Ctrl-"Key" for replacing paradigm, that kind of related batch of needs.)

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  19. 7 votes
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  20. 3 votes
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    Roy commented  · 

    Perhaps it could allow a Named Range to contain the desired formatting string, or allow it to be created dynamically (in the Named Range so the spreadsheet formulas are "cleaner" and easier to understand).

    And that could allow for conditionality in the formatting string/s and then MS could "let the best man win": see which way people prefer, or wonder why, when they make a mix of choices. All without dropping the current scheme.

    However, I did think of it originally in the vein of overriding local formatting in whatever way one regarded as important, without affecting the underlying formatting or using conditonal formatting: both of the "withouts" CARRY the special formatting with them without any indication of it being there. That lead to surprises, and complicate the spreadsheet for MS to save, display, and use (leading to huge files and... failed files, unsalvageable files).

    It also means that one can no longer click column L, say, and apply a format up and down it in a couple clicks. One must format only those cells that do not have special formatting. And has to identify those first. 13 cells out of 8,000 rows, say... But this way, one can easily format the column but the specially formatted cells carry their specialness in unaffected formulas.

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