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Erik Berger

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  1. 4 votes
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  2. 12 votes
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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    NO, big NO!! The last-searched for text should be selected, which it is in my version. That way I can easily repeat the same Find&Replace command (e.g., for a different cell range selection) if I wish, and if I want to do a new search or enter a new replace string, I just overwrite the text.
    If the text is not automatically selected, that is wrong, but clearing the last item is NOT the solution!

  3. 23 votes
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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    In my version, all text is already selected upon shifting focus to the text field, which I think is good. Thus, no need for Ctrl-A?

  4. 1 vote
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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    Ah whatever, I'm so used to it for so many years that I might get confused if this is fixed?

    But worse is, as of this week, Ctrl-H does NOT open the Replace tab at all, but focus is on the Find tab, so no difference from Ctrl-B (F?) (Ctrl-B for me - probably Ctrl-F in english version - btw that has always sucked that shortcuts depend on language used).

  5. 825 votes
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    Great suggestion – thanks again for taking the time to put it on this site and for the thoughtful followup comments. This is pretty related to some other work we’ve got going and already has a fair number of votes, so we’ll work on getting plans in place now and hope to get started on this soon.

    Thanks,
    John [MS XL]

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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    Hm, then why not simply call it =EMPTY() ?

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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    I would agree with Conor O'Dowd (March 29, 2016 23:59), except it might be dangerous to change behaviour of the existing function/constant NA()/#NA. I could also agree with Harlan Grove (June 03, 2016 20:41), that #MISSING might be clearer than #NULL.
    But anyway, I think the plotting option dialog should offer to take care of error values!

    Erik Berger supported this idea  · 
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    Erik Berger commented  · 

    Why not simply add "invalid" to the graph option dialog for treating hidden and empty cells?? I.e. "hidden, empty and invalid cells" -> treat as zero, treat as gap or interpolate.
    Though I agree, the ability to create a true blank using a formula would be appreciated (as well).

  6. 1,087 votes
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    Thanks to everyone for the votes and discussion about having undo independently in each workbook. Even though this request has been here for a long time, we are listening and we realize that it can be frustrating if you press Undo while you’re in one workbook and it undoes something in another workbook. We’ve been considering the technical challenges to make Undo work “per workbook”, and want to share some details about it with you.

    The undo process relies on the state of all open workbooks being exactly the same after an “undo” as they were before the undone action was taken. One example of how undo “per workbook” is problematic is with linked workbooks. Let’s say you have WorkbookA, with a formula that refers to WorkbookB, such as =SUMIFS. This formula will give the sum of values in WorkbookB in range A1:A10 that have “Yes” in the…

    Erik Berger supported this idea  · 

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