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Kenneth Barber

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  1. 3 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Instead of having, for example, 1 sheet for each month, put all of the data from your sheets into the same table on the same sheet and add a month column.

  2. 3 votes
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  3. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Like you mentioned, you can use a slicer to do this. If you don't want the slicer to be visible, just put it in a hidden sheet. Power BI has the behaviour that you are describing. If one visual gets filtered, all of the other visuals on the same page can also be filtered.

  4. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    The suggestion linked below is along the same lines as what you are suggesting. It suggests that we should be able to expand and collapse those 4 areas to create more room.
    https://excel.uservoice.com/forums/304921-excel-for-windows-desktop-application/suggestions/10536174-add-ability-to-collapse-field-areas-in-pivottable

  5. 3 votes
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  6. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Workaround: In your source table, add a column with the numbers 1, 2, 3, etc. In your PivotTable, sort your field in ascending order by this new column.

    For the record, PivotTables that are based on the Power Pivot Data Model have an additional option to sort by the data source order.

  7. 3 votes
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  8. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Maybe you should have done some research before purchasing.

  9. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    You can read cell values into Power Query. Your cell just needs to be part of a table or be directly referenced by a named range. Put each of the functions below into their own query.

    Get Name:
    (#"Name" as text) as any => Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[#"Name" = #"Name"]}[Content]

    Get Name Value:
    (#"Name" as text) as any => Table.FirstValue(#"Get Name"(#"Name"))

    Key To Value:
    (#"Key" as text) as text => #"Get Name"("KeyValue"){[#"Key" = #"Key"]}[Value]

    Get Name Value can be used to get the value of a named range whose name you gave to the function. If, in Excel, you have a table called KeyToValue with a Key column and a Value column, then the Key To Value function returns the Value corresponding to a given Key. Notice that both functions depend on the Get Name function, which returns tables and named ranges from Excel as tables.

  10. 3 votes
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  11. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    I think that the better suggestion would be for the Excel to remember the zoom level, whether at the workbook level or at the application level. I use a laptop, so my screen space is limited. If your suggestion were implemented, I would have to zoom out all the time.

  12. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    A term like "Data Model functions" would be appropriate. Measures are functions whose input is always the entire Data Model plus its filter context and shadow filter contexts.

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  13. 3 votes
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  14. 3 votes
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  15. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Power Pivot lets you write your own aggregations (measures) using the DAX language. It is tough to learn, but it works well.

  16. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    The reason why we have both XLSX and XLSM is because macros have the power to do a lot of things, like read or delete files from your computer, fill up your computer with spam files or viruses, etc. This makes macros a security issue, and so it's nice to have a format where you are guaranteed to not have to deal with any trickery from macros. Power Pivot cannot wreak such havoc. It can only calculate stuff, so the reason for macro-enabled workbooks having their own format does not apply to Power Pivot.

  17. 3 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    Grand totals on the left and the top. This would be consistent with the way that subtotals are shown, at least for rows. By default, subtotals are on top. but you have the option to put them at the bottom.

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  18. 2 votes
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    I would agree with this if the order of the tables in the Data View didn't seem to change randomly after I refresh everything. Maybe it's because my tables come from Power Query?

  19. 1 vote
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  20. 1 vote
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    Kenneth Barber commented  · 

    With the way that the fields are named in your example (abbreviated, hard to remember), I don't think that a search bar would help much.

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